Tag: config

Juniper Control Plane Protection

I already wrote about Control Plane Protection in one of my previous posts focused on Cisco device configuration. Here we will make the same thing on Juniper device, I was using Juniper SRX300 and Juniper SRX1500 devices in my lab.

CoPP ??

Control Plane Protection (CoPP) is a method of protecting processor unit, running services on your network device, against excessive flooding. Excessive flooding of traffic aimed towards your router/firewall processor, being that valid or malicious, is always undesirable and can also be dangerous.

A network device, which starts the receive more control traffic that his processor can process, will eventually experience control traffic packet drops and it will lead to some of the router functions to become unstable. Some of the most common control traffic generating services on a router are routing protocols with different update packets, Spanning Tree with BPDU packets, HSRP, CDP, ARP, and different management traffic services like SSH, SNMP, RADIUS etc.

Some of those control plane traffic types are more important than others but they all have in common the fact that they don’t normally use much bandwidth to function. Having that in mind, it is easy to conclude that the situation above with router processor at 100% because of control plane traffic is most surely caused by a DDoS attack towards your device.

More unusual is the situation when a neighboring device is experiencing some kind of malfunction which makes him send large amounts of control plane traffic out of his interfaces towards your device.

CoPP is the best way to avoid this kind of attacks or malfunctions to get in the way of your network device stability. CoPP is basically configuration of QoS inbound to your device control plane (CPU).

CoPP Best Practices

The way to configure CoPP in the most stable and effective way is to use guaranteed minimal available bandwidth for each control plane traffic type.

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When they throw a Cisco guy to do something with HP networking gear

…There’s a nice little pdf to get you through

UPDATE on 13 Nov 2015:
It was a real pleasure to have Jeff Carell joining in with a comment about an updated version of “HP Networking and Cisco CLI Reference Guide”. Jeff is the author of “Guide to TCP/IP 4th Ed”, a great network fellow and IPv6 enthusiast whose work on informing the community about networking technology is greatly appreciated by the author of this blog. Link is added to the end of the post. Thanks Jeff.

HP is aware that most of networking engineers start their learning process in Cisco Networking Academy. Is is a normal course of events if you want to learn networking. Cisco has the very best study materials and best, carefully developed syllabus that is both high quality and most detailed in the world of networking. Not to mention the high reputation that engineers get with Cisco certificates standing by their names.

Cisco CLI

On the other hand, when you take an average mid-size business customer today you will probably see that he is mostly concerned about the price and not so much about the feature-set and robustness of IT equipment. And there you have your situation in which customer decides to go with HP rather than Cisco gear in their communication closet.

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