Month: December 2015

Static Route Load Balance

How it works?

If you have two routers / two Layer3 switches connected with two L3 links (two paths) you can route with two equal static routes towards the same prefix and the router will load balance traffic across both links.

The idea is to make two same static routes on the same router but with different next-hops. The question was: Which link or which route will be used? And if the traffic will be load balanced, which mechanism will be used to share the traffic across both of links.

static route load balancing

 

ip route 10.0.0.0 255.0.0.0 192.168.10.2
ip route 10.0.0.0 255.0.0.0 192.168.11.2

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What is route recursion

We are going back to networking basics with this post. In few lines below you will find most important theory that makes network gear do its job.

The main router job is to making routing decisions to be able to route packets toward their destination. Sometimes that includes recursive lookup of routing table if the next-hop value is not available via connected interface.

Routing decision on end devices

Lets have a look at routing decision that happens if we presume that we have a PC connected on our Ethernet network.

If one device wants to send a packet to another device, it first needs to find an answer to these questions:

  • Is maybe the destination IP address chunk of local subnet IP range?
    • If that is true, packet will be forwarded to the neighbour device using Layer 2 in the ARP example below.
    • If that is not the case, does the device network card configuration include a router address through which that destination can be reached? (default gateway)
  • Device then looks at his local ARP table. Does it include a MAC address associated with the destination IP address?
    • If the destination is not part of the local subnet, does the local ARP table contain the MAC address of the nearest router? (MAC address to IP address mapping of default gateway router)